Wine glass size in England from 1700 to 2017: a measure of our time

from The BMJ: leading general medical journal. Research. Education. Comment | The BMJ

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Wine glass size in England from 1700 to 2017: a measure of our time | The BMJ


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vinay requested a fact check

This article makes the claim that larger glasses lead to people drinking more. An "almost 10% increase in sales" is mentioned, which seems to be based on a research paper at a single bar in Cambridge. It seems hard to believe they could account for all the variables affecting sales at a bar. Was the study cited in the paper big enough to make a statistically sound finding?


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tagged a counterpoint
Environmental cues such as the design of drinking glasses—particularly their size—may also have contributed to increased drinking, particularly of wine.

This article towards the end contains a statement that contradicts this one: "We cannot infer that the increase in glass size and the rise in wine consumption in England are causally linked. Nor can we infer that reducing glass size would cut drinking"